What is industrial furniture

In short: Industrial furniture is large, open apartments with few (if any) internal walls, high ceilings and, often, floor-to-ceiling windows. They kept the industrial bones of the buildings by incorporating their functional features: exposed piping, ventilator tubes, support beams and poles, and wood or concrete floors.

Industrial furniture is quite simply all the rage these days. Gone are the days when furniture had to either give off an old-school antique appearance or look overly sleek, polished and metallic. Industrial furniture is all about embracing the rugged, the asymmetrical and the imperfect.

Recycled, upcycled and salvaged materials often work well with industrial furniture simply because they fit in nicely with the ethos of such furniture. With less of a focus on the sleek and polished and a greater acceptance of beauty in imperfection, industrial furniture and eco-focused materials go together well.

Industrial furniture has the ability to lend spaces — whether they are bedrooms, offices or public spaces — a degree of rustic character whilst still being hip, making them a great option for a variety of physical environments.

The industrial look is essential to this style as well. Exposing materials others try to hidelike brick or concrete, exposed beams, pipes and vents, and using monochrome colors, along with concepts like minimalism and utilitarianism all define important aspects of industrial design. If you incorporate industrial modern design into your home, it’ll feel like you’re in a newly mechanized factory in the early 1900’s. However, contemporary industrial style combines modern aesthetics to create an excellent and unique contrast that pleases the eye.

Industrial modern style is characterized by a raw and unfinished look. Its aesthetics cut out the excess and lean towards practicality of form. Exposed hardware, unfinished metals and wood, distressed finishes, and factory inspired pieces are what it’s all about. This style relies heavily on industrial furniture, or furniture that looks like it was used in a factory setting. Items like a drill press stool, an old dentist’s lamp or a drafting table could all be considered factory furniture.  This style adds to the industrial modern mindset with its clean lines and utilitarian forms.

When picturing these designs, we typically think of lofts with big open windows and lots of exposed brick. Those who live in less urban environments may feel they don’t have the right surroundings, that their living spaces are too traditional to really pull off this look.

We’re here to tell you that couldn’t be further from the truth. Let us prove to you that every room can benefit from a dose of industrial style. Continue below to learn more about why this look works and how you can bring it into your own interiors. Before you know it, you’ll be ready to create an industrial design of your own.